KidZone

Mind Challenge

is a new competition series that will test the mental agility of the nation’s smartest children, aged 7-12.

MindChallengeNumbersYoung academics from across the country are invited to sign up:  applicants will need to be highly gifted academically, with significant IQ scores and abilities well above their grade level. The competition will be celebratory and supportive, showcasing great young minds and their exceptional abilities.

Regional qualifiers will be held across the country this summer, with successful contestants progressing to a prestigious grand final in the nation’s capital. The winner of the competition will be named “America’s Junior Mind Challenge Champion 2015” and be awarded a monetary prize to assist in future academic endeavors.

We welcome math whizzes, junior chess champions, advanced coders or cryptologists; budding scientists or doctors, ace spellers to come join this academic adventure.

Emmy nominated producers Shed Media, creators of ‘Supernanny’ and ‘Who Do You think you Are?’ have teamed up with a major broadcast network to bring you Mind Challenge!

For further information about ‘Memory Challenge’, please contact: Michael Yates at Myates@shedmedia.com

Parents who are interested in applying can download the application Here.


 

Visit the G-tec Kids Website
Where Kids Ideas Take Flight

gtecIf your child craves challenge and loves to learn, G·tec Kids is the perfect after school enrichment program. We cater to gifted and talented students in grades 2 through 5.Through hands-on learning, children are encouraged to be critical, cutting-edge, outside-of-the-box thinkers. Using drama, history, visual arts, science, and computers, children are free to explore the limits of their imagination and use their natural abilities to excel beyond the pack. Call today if your child would like to design Ancient Roman bridges, work up an architectural plan, build an instrument, and film an animated movie.  (914) 636-0888.


 

Epsilon Camp

EpsilonLogoA residential camp serving promising young mathematicians and their families through an intensive student program and parent workshop. This program is for children who are not only very competent at math, but are passionate about it.


 

Delta Camp

DeltaCampLogoA residential mathematics summer camp & a parent workshop—running in parallel. A learning environment for extremely high-IQ 6½ to 8 year-olds who are lit up by math. The camp runs alongside Epsilon Camp and is similar, except that it is tailored for the needs of the EG/PG who are 6½ to not yet 9 years of age.


 

The Space Place Page

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Explore the Solar System from home.

Start exploring our Solar System like never before with the Launch button, or jump into a module about a mission or spaceflight technology. Travel with Voyager at the edge of our solar system, land on Mars with Curiosity, learn about the power systems behind Curiosity, Voyager and other missions or fly with Juno to the giant planet Jupiter.


Exploring the Water World

Ninety-nine percent of the space inhabited by living creatures on Earth is under water. In many ways, Earth is as alien to us as any other planet or moon in our solar system. At least we can now learn about it without having to rely on instruments set adrift on the waves.

Click WATER WORLD for the article of the month: April 2013.

 

The Art of Space Imagery

By Diane K. Fisher

When you see spectacular space images taken in infrared light by the Spitzer Space Telescope and other non-visible-light telescopes, you may wonder where those beautiful colors came from? After all, if the telescopes were recording infrared or ultraviolet light, we wouldn’t see anything at all. So are the images “colorized” or “false colored”?

No, not really. The colors are translated. Just as a foreign language can be translated into our native language, an image made with light that falls outside the range of our seeing can be “translated” into colors we can see. Scientists process these images so they can not only see them, but they can also tease out all sorts of information the light can reveal. For example, wisely done color translation can reveal relative temperatures of stars, dust, and gas in the images, and show fine structural details of galaxies and nebulae.

This image of M101 combines images from four different telescopes, each detecting a different part of the spectrum. Red indicates infrared information from Spitzer’s 24-micron detector, and shows the cool dust in the galaxy. Yellow shows the visible starlight from the Hubble telescope. Cyan is ultraviolet light from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer space telescope, which shows the hottest and youngest stars. And magenta is X-ray energy detected by the Chandra X-ray Observatory, indicating incredibly hot activity, like accretion around black holes.
This image of M101 combines images from four different telescopes, each detecting a different part of the spectrum. Red indicates infrared information from Spitzer’s 24-micron detector, and shows the cool dust in the galaxy. Yellow shows the visible starlight from the Hubble telescope. Cyan is ultraviolet light from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer space telescope, which shows the hottest and youngest stars. And magenta is X-ray energy detected by the Chandra X-ray Observatory, indicating incredibly hot activity, like accretion around black holes.

Spitzer’s Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), for example, is a four-channel camera, meaning that it has four different detector arrays, each measuring light at one particular wavelength. Each image from each detector array resembles a grayscale image, because the entire detector array is responding to only one wavelength of light. However, the relative brightness will vary across the array.

So, starting with one detector array, the first step is to determine what is the brightest thing and the darkest thing in the image. Software is used to pick out this dynamic range and to re-compute the value of each pixel. This process produces a grey-scale image. At the end of this process, for Spitzer, we will have four grayscale images, one for each for the four IRAC detectors.

Matter of different temperatures emit different wavelengths of light. A cool object emits longer wavelengths (lower energies) of light than a warmer object. So, for each scene, we will see four grayscale images, each of them different.

Normally, the three primary colors are assigned to these gray-scale images based on the order they appear in the spectrum, with blue assigned to the shortest wavelength, and red to the longest. In the case of Spitzer, with four wavelengths to represent, a secondary color is chosen, such as yellow. So images that combine all four of the IRAC’s infrared detectors are remapped into red, yellow, green, and blue wavelengths in the visible part of the spectrum.

Download a new Spitzer poster of the center of the Milky Way. On the back is a more complete and colorfully-illustrated explanation of the “art of space imagery.” Go to spaceplace.nasa.gov/posters/#milky-way.

This article was provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Moon Phases

moon-phases-300x233The New Moon may become kids’ favorite Moon phase after they have done the new Cookie Moon activity on NASA’s Space Place. That’s because they get to lick off all the creme filling on an Oreo® cookie. This is a fun way for kids to learn why the Moon has phases and why it looks the way it does throughout the month—not an easy concept for anyone! This activity will be a sweet experience for all! Visit SpacePlace for Moon Phases.


 

Comet Quest

Rosetta: A comet mission like no other

comet-quest1-300x228Rosetta is a mission of the European Space Agency, with help from NASA. It will study the comet nucleus for an extended time. It will drop a small lander on the nucleus and orbit for two years. Both orbiter and lander carry many scientific instruments to learn about the comet and how it changes as it approaches the Sun. You can see these challenges for yourself when you play “Comet Quest”. Click here to experience the challenge: Comet Quest.


 

Recycle This!

recycleIt’s hard to remember always to recycle. Maybe it would help if you could make a targeted tossing contest out of it every time you threw something into a bin. Well, now you can practice by playing “Recycle THIS!” on NASA’s Climate Kids website, Recycle This!

Recyclables, as well as plain old trash, are being thrown out of somebody’s window up above, and, using your tiny “Airburst” tool, you have to deflect each object’s path into the correct bin. Does it belong with glass? Metal? Paper? Plastic? Or is it just trash that will decompose soon enough in a landfill? Music and sound effects (with separate on/off switches) add realism and excitement. You’ll soon be an expert recycler—of whom the planet needs a lot more!


 

What’s it like to walk in the shoes of a meteorologist?

weatherThey’re not all on TV, you know! Read a first-person account of a most passionate one, Tim Schmit, on “Mission Chronicles,” the Space Place blog written by scientists and engineers themselves. See Meteorologist.

Check out these other great pages for kids:

Sci Jinks | Space Place | Climate Kids